Friday, February 21, 2014

Why I bought a new laptop and a new desktop computer in the "post PC era"

I recently bought both a new Windows laptop and desktop:
The Lenovo Yoga Pro 2 is for work and earned an editors choice award from CNET.  Right now it's used for testing and demos until the IBM CIO's Office approves Windows 8 for business use. It's a fantastic laptop: thin, light, powerful and with a gorgeous high-resolution display.

The HP desktop replaces a Gateway desktop I purchased a little over three years ago which had started exhibiting hardware problems including a crashed hard drive. Since I needed more storage space and wanted to upgrade to Windows 8 anyway (the Gateway was running Windows 7) I decided to purchase a new desktop rather than putting more money into a three year old sick desktop.  This is the only PC desktop in our home and is used daily for web browsing, paying bills and keeping track of finances. The desktop also serves as my home media server (photos, music and video).    I use a cloud backup service (Carbonite) to backup over 1GB of data.  I also use iTunes Music Match and Google Play Music. I use Google Play play my old time radio collection since iTunes Music Match doesn't support MP3's less than 96Kbps 

Truth be told, my wife and kids use their mobile devices (iPhone, iPad, iPod Touch, iPad Mini) far more than our desktop PC and I did consider not replacing it.  All of the task could be performed on smartphone or tablet, leveraging cloud storage.  However, cloud storage is fairly expensive.  For example Amazon charges $500 a year for 1 TB of storage.  That said, with PC sales continuing to sink, more and more users are clearly not replacing their existing PC as they are using them less or not at all.  I'm probably not the typical use case.  In the end, I decided to by the new HP desktop and our family has been happy with the decision.

While I'm a heavy user of my Apple iPhone and Android and iPad tablets at work,  I can't get all my work done on these devices.  I need a PC operating system like Microsoft Windows or Apple Macintosh.  Why? There are a number of applications that I use for business that either aren't available or lack key capabilities.  That said, the gap continues to close.  For some, there is no gap and they've migrated 100% to mobile and the cloud.

I'm interested in your thoughts.   Have you gone 100% mobile (mobile only) or are you mobile first? (leveraging a PC when needed)

1 comment:

Joseph Russo said...
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